Discover Lerouge

Pinhole cameras lovingly handcrafted by Philippe Leclerc, from sycamore wood and beautifully clever simplicity. 

 This is their story...

 

Simple, fun, beautiful. 

Taking photos without a lens, through a simple pinhole in a box, takes you back to the very roots of photography, the camera obscura, and far, far away from your electronic gadgets. 

You do not have to know anything about photography to use these beautifully simple cameras. 

They may look like toys, and they can certainly be used by children from a very early age, but they are handmade and precision crafted cameras, designed to take a standard film. Children and grown-ups, amateurs, students and professionals alike will delight in their simplicity, their enormous creative potential, their beautiful design and their exquisite craftsmanship. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sweet yet deeply original and creative gifts, great for the classroom, wonderful for the photographer who has everything, a breath of fresh air for the electronically tired soul, amazing for low tech experimentation. Awaken your tired digitally altered mind with stylish grass roots good-ole-fashioned-with-a-twist traditional photography. Newcomers can learn a great deal through the simple application of a few fundamental aspects of physics.  

Standard Film- Simple Processing

Most of the range is designed for standard formats of widely available film: 35mm and 120 Roll Film (medium format). The 135 and 66 are standard in every way meaning you can run a roll of standard film through and simply have it developed by your local lab! The whole range will also appeal to those who prefer to develop their own film at home or in the dark room. There is even one for fans of large format, that takes standard 4x5 sheet film holders. Philippe actually recommends this one for beginners, as you can use it with direct positive paper. 

  Handcrafted

The story of Philippe Leclerc and his amazing Lerouge stenopes. 

 Sténopé is French for "pinhole camera", from the greek for... little hole! It's best pronounced Staynopay (which sounds like a generous invitation) with a Geordie accent, but we quite like stenope, riming with hope. 

 

 

  

Philippe Leclerc is a professional photographer whose work we find awe inspiring (visit his website from the link at the bottom of this page). He is also an engineer with 20 years experience. He builds these beautiful objects in his woodworking workshop, at his home in Bayeux, home of the tapestry.  

It took a whole year from paper to production.

 

Be prepared to be delighted by the magical results you can obtain with such deceptively simple technology!

 

EXPLORE THE COLLECTION

 

Discover Philippe Leclerc, photographer: https://www.philippeleclerc.fr/en/

 

 

 Photos ©Philippe Leclerc and ©GreenwichCameras 2018